A Cheesy Day Out

Like many we find present giving often becomes difficult the longer you know someone – there are only so many purple jumpers you can give a person. Over the years Christine (my husband’s sister) and I have had several Activity days instead. Learning/improving a skill whilst spending a day away from the children does have its attractions (we love them really)

We have learnt the basic intricacies of both Thai and Indian cookery, improved our bread-making ability and made a good team creating a flavoured sausage you will never find in a butcher’s cabinet.

Our latest ‘day out’ was to the Northumberland Cheese Company. https://www.northumberlandcheese.co.uk/

The day started gently with a coffee and a chat with Martin (Manager), previously a Naval Chef he discovered a passion for cheese after leaving the service.

Once acquainted we were instructed to ‘don the appropriate gear’ – white coats, wellies and a hairnet – and had a very instructive guide through the various ‘cheese rooms’ so we could gather a sense of the process from when the milk arrives to the point of distribution of cheese to the customers.

Then it was down to the business of producing cheese – the visitors (us) have the option to observe or to join in. Well, we are both ‘hands on’ folk so having rolled up our sleeves and thoroughly washed our hands we joined in the days work. I think that doing something improves the learning of a skill – plus it provided a greater opportunity to ask questions. We had so many queries Craig must have ended the day with a headache.

Both batches were made using Jersey milk – although the morning’s cheese will differ from the afternoon’s due to the various techniques used during the maturing process.  One will sit in brine for 24 hours, the other will spend time in the Mould Room (enough science, I learnt a lot in 6 hours but not enough to give a lecture)

We added starters and Rennet when instructed. I learnt why my one previous attempt to use Rennet was a disaster – always read and abide by the instructions is now my advice.

There was great fun in cutting the curds (often performed by a rotating set of cutters – but we just had to try).

We then impersonated ‘artisans’ when we netted and transferred the curds to the moulds – overseen by Craig and Johnny, who also made sure each mould had the correct weight as it was surprising how quickly the whey separates even more and what was once a full mould becomes shallow.

We attempted to assist with the ‘turning’ of the moulds but quickly decided that really was best left to the experts, although we did help to remove the nets.

We think, in total, we assisted with making 180KG of cheese. We were not involved with the making of the Wedding Cake you will be pleased to note, although we did have the opportunity to make a small round for ourselves. Christine made sure those moulds were well filled 😊

I was really surprised at the volume of whey that is left over once the curds are removed so it was good to hear how it is re-cycled back on the farm (well, excluding what we spilt on the floor – it really is a messy business)

In-between batches we were treated to lunch in the café. It is very popular so call in if you are passing and enjoy a drink and light meal. Follow the link for directions. https://www.northumberlandcheese.co.uk/cheese-loft-cafe

I tried the Cheese Soup, new to me, and very good it was too. Each day the soup is made fresh using any available cheese so each day it is different. Very recommended.

A cheese tasting session encouraged me to try cheeses I would not normally taste – the Nettle was surprisingly mild whilst my favourite was the Original, a mild cheese yet full of flavour.

Now, we must wait 12 weeks for the 500g sample of ‘our’ cheese to arrive in the post.

(note – except for photo of Cheese Company building, taken by myself, all other photos are from Google Images. We were too busy to have even thought of taking in a camera and I doubt it would have been permitted)

Photo Acknowledgement:

Featured Image – Photo by Alexander Maasch on Unsplash

 

 

 

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